Santa Fe Community Educators Network is a project of the Santa Fe Birth to Career Collaboration, a collective impact initiative supported by the Santa Fe Community Foundation.

Minutes of April 27th, 2018 Meeting

May 3, 2018

Santa Fe Community Educators Network

Meeting for April 27th, 2018

Udall Building

 

In Attendance: Rayna Dineen, Reading Quest; Amy Miller, May Center for Learning; Molly Timmins, VISTA; Carol Aubrey, Transformational Learning; Shannon Palermo, Railyard Park Conservancy; Leslie Fagve, MOIFA; Patricia Sigala, MOIFA; Kemely Gomez, SITE Santa Fe; Winoka, SITE Santa Fe; Katie Weeks, Audubon NM; Diego Medina, O’Keeffe Museum; Sarah Zurick, O’Keeffe Museum; Leona Hillary, SF Children’s Museum; Veronica Black, SITE Santa Fe; Amanda Lee, SITE Santa Fe; Shannon Bay, O’Keeffe; Emily McRae, VISTA; Alanna Herrera, Wise Fool NM; Mollie Parsons, SFBG; Mollie Toll, OAS/MNM; Shawna Jones, SFBG; Elysia Poon, SAR; Brenna Two Bear, SAR; Samuel Catanach, SAR.

 

Committee Reports:

  • Adelante

    • We still have availability for May 2nd and 9th

    • (Children’s Museum may be able to cover)

  • Creative Collaborations

    • May 1st showcase event : Set up 2-5 that day at SITE, can't stick things to the walls

  • 21st Century Teacher Trainings

    • Date for the training will be determined soon

    • There will be an open call this year for organizations interested in putting on trainings

    • This year teachers requested topics to be covered, instead of trainers selecting what they wanted to share as in previous years

    • Training happens 2x a year (August + January)

    • Hands - on, engaging, fun, after school programming curriculum

    • 4 yr. federal grant, we are in 2nd year -- switching curriculum in the final 2 years

  • Teacher Resource Fair

    • October 3rd, SITE Santa Fe

    • Registration will open this summer

  • Summer Program

    • Awarded $15000 grant - goal is $24,000 total (almost there!)

    • 2 weeks still available:

      • June 11th- 15th and June 18th - 22nd (ECRA)

 

Literacy Training: Rayna Dineen and Amy Miller

NOTE: This notes are in companion to the Power Point

  • Exercises for setting up a positive group culture while integrating literacy

    • Form a circle for these exercises. Circles are a helpful shape because no one is at the head of the class -- everyone is positioned equally

    • Names with Syllables

      • All participants have to move into correct ABC order of their names without talking (Ex: Alex → Daniel → Emily → Garret)

      • Each participant says their name according to the number of syllables for the name and claps on each syllable in their name (How many beats are in your name?)

        • Participant says name with syllables and the group repeats

        • (Can extend this activity by having children group themselves according to the number of syllables in their name)

    • Name Ball Toss

      • Learning everyones name early on is very important and sometimes it take awhile to learn new names. Pronouncing names correctly (how the participant would like them to be pronounced) honors that individual from the beginning

      • Make eye contact and throw the ball to a person across the circle and say their name (Participant can ask each others names if they don’t know!)

      • Once someone has been thrown the ball, they put hands behind their back so that everyone gets thrown to only once

      • Each person needs to remember who they threw it to and the name of that person

      • GOAL: Go through the same order of ball throwing and saying names in the number of seconds as there are participants in the circle (Ex: 27 people, go through rotation in 27 seconds)

        • Groups will dramatically improve by the end of the week if they have a chance to work on this exercise a little bit each day

      • Help the group strategize how to speed up the time it takes to get through the rotation, encourage them reach the answers themselves before proving suggestions. Encourage them to think outside the box. It may take several days for the group to figure out strategies that work.

        • Establish with kids what to say when someone drops it; ‘its okay’

        • Watch person who is throwing it to you; make eye contact

        • Remember the name of the person you are throwing to

        • Get closer together

        • Throw straight across instead of up

        • Note: The circle cannot be rearranged

      • Teacher can use relevant words or terms in the place of names to practice vocabulary

      • Can add multiple balls at the same time to increase the challenge level

      • Maybe 15 - 20 min a day

      • Why are we doing this?

        • Group bonding

        • Help the group learn each other's names - knowing names will enhance the group dynamic in future activities

        • Practice cooperating - everyone is in it together

        • Great for working memory because you are forced to hold word memory and physical memory in your brain at the same time

        • Helpful for kinesthetic learners, solidifies memory around names

        • Kids love movement games - no winner or lose, just working together

        • Shows that we all have each others backs which sets a precedent for the rest of the week

 

    • Creating Group Norms

      • Kids might have different ideas for what it means to be respectful

      • Creating it WITH the kids, instead of just having rules being presented to them is empowering and increases the likelihood that they will adopt those agreements

        • Not a real expectation until kids have signed the agreements

      • Can use a custom name for the norms depending on your program

        • Ex: ‘The Code of the Badger’

        • HOWLS (Habits of Work and Learning)

        • Helps buy in

      • Question prompt: How do we want to learn as a group?

      • What do norms look like? Sound like? Feel like?

        • Words can become buzz words, but what do they actually MEAN

      • Norms can go beyond ground rules for respect, can also have norms that encourage the group to reach its highest potential

      • Ex: Courage. What does it mean to the group to be courageous?

        • Standing up for yourself

        • Be brave

        • Be in charge of yourself

      • Ex: Don’t being afraid to try new things and make mistakes

        • Maintain a Growth Mindset

      • Ex: Respect of material

      • Help the group reach key norms (kindness, respect, inclusivity, etc.)

      • Begin by brainstorming as a group, what norms would be? (4 min)

      • Then look at all suggestions and identify points that can be combined, make a comprehensive list.

        • This process can take 30 min to an hour

 

  • Scarborough’s Reading Rope

  1. Language Comprehension

      • An essential factor for kids to develop reading skills

      2. Words recognition

      • Ability to decode words

      • Ability to process the sounds of the language

      • Word recognition is the reason that it is important for children to be in a language rich environment

      → Skilled Reader: has the ability to read and comprehend

  • This is the outcome that we are aiming for

    •  

       

  • Implementation of Language Enrichment in YOUR Programs

    • Third and fourth grades are critical ages, kids shifting from learning to read to reading to learn

      • Students may have been able to ‘fake it’ to compensate and get by until abotu 3rd grade (memorizing and repeating)

    • If child doesn't have those skills and can’t comprehend by 3rd grade - they begin to fall further and further behind

    • If we continue to enrich their language over the summer, we prevent further slip

    • Most children learn best when interacting with REAL STUFF

    • The abstract thinking is just beginning in 3rd grade

    • Grounding their knowledge in the concrete in order to reach abstract

 

  • Background knowledge

    • Low income backgrounds → lower baseline knowledge of the world → leads to poorer comprehension

    • What background knowledge do you expect a student will have when they enter your program?

      • Ex: What is an artist?

        • What do they need to know to understand that?

          • What art is

            • An experience working with tools

            • A life choice

      • Ex: What are primary colors?

      • Ex: What is a plant?

      • Ex: Knowledge of their own culture and stories

    • With no background knowledge what consequences might your students have?

      • Feel inadequate and enter the situation with anxiety

      • Have a more limited view

  • 2nd language learners don’t have as much context for literacy language (metaphors, etc)

  • Literacy language relies on background knowledge

    • Ex: Wind (double meaning)

  • Judgements you make (inferences) when entering a room based background knowledge and clues that you pick up.

    • Ex: What inference can you make when entering this room?

      • Its a meeting. Why?

        • One person at the front of the room

        • Other people are sitting listening to the individual at the front

        • Everyone is wearing name tags

    • Some kids walk in and have no idea what is going on

  • Examples of how to build background knowledge → Creating a Knowledge Network

    • Visual anchor (cue) that they can continue returning to

    • Categories that they can sort information to

    • Use analogies

      • How is this like something else that I already know? How is it different?

    • Provide opportunity during your summer program for read aloud

      • For your curriculum, what are relevant read-aloud texts that you can do?

      • Resource: Reading A - Z, print and make books, helps to address varying reading levels - provides same information at various reading levels

      •  

  • Vocabulary Building

    • Build oral language bank for students

    • Often students are not engaging with text over summer

    • 20 min a day for read aloud (by teacher) or independent reading helps bridge this gap

      • Having students read aloud to each other is not always best because it is not great for building vocabulary and forcing children to read aloud and induce anxiety

      • Choral Reading (reading altogether) is also a good option

        • Slightly changing the words of a well known song for them to read it

      • Teacher reading aloud helps because students comprehension level is usually above their reading level

    • Figuring out vocabulary for YOUR program and focusing on those

      • Pick a word

      • Explain it using student - friendly definitions

        • Ex: Habitat - where plants and animals live

      • Have them say it back to you

      • Reinforced definition, reinforced it in a complete sentence

    • Sentence Stem: framework so that THEY fill in the information

      • Build language base around what you are teaching

 

  • Academic Language: Help kids understand it

    • This is the ‘Language of Power’ in our society

    • Children familiar with this type of language are more likely to be successful in school

    • Social language: slang, repetition of words

    • Academic: content specific vocabulary based

    • Ex: “analyze this painting” they must know what analyze means

    • You must identify the academic language that is required for understanding your curriculum

    • Ex: Design

      • What does this word mean?

      • What are examples of things that you know are designed?

        • Multiple meanings (ex: house and also pattern on a shirt)

      • Clap out beats

      • Write it out the way it SOUNDS

      • Provide practice (ex: designing your garden)

      • There is an opportunity for students to learn words during the summer they can remember contextually later on

 

  • Internalizing Language is Key to Self-Regulation

    • We talk to ourselves in our heads over time → but this is a skill that children need to develop over time

    • You can model self talk for your students

    • Verbalize everything that is going on in your head as you are completing an activity

      • Model that you aren’t perfect, gives kids permission to make mistakes

      • Let them see that when things go wrong you are talking yourself through it, not waiting for someone else to fix the issue

 

  • STOP TALKING!

    • Teachers often talk too much which leads kids to tune out

    • Silence between pieces of information allow students the opportunity to think

    • Alternatives to talking: model, provide visuals

    • Visual cues and schedules: allows you to spend less time telling the kids what to do and more time focusing on what you want them to learn

      • STOP Sign to cue silence

      • Work Strip and Visual Checklist of what kids are going to accomplish that day

        • Take square off when they have finished that task and put in done pile

      • Visual Checklists for short term goals

        • Written schedule of day

        • Helps them stay anchored on what they are doing that day

      • Identifying Features of Being Ready for an Activity

        • Look at photo and circle key features of being ready for an activity

      • Get Ready, Do, Done

        • Get ready spot (yellow), do spot (green), done spot (red)

  • Madlib sentences for getting students writing when they are stuck

    • Have the students give you a verbal answer and you write out the sentence with some blanks

    • Then the students can fill out blanks even if they don't remember what they said

      • This is less intimidating than a blank page

  • Takeaways:

    • Team building from beginning to make connections

    • It would be helpful activities we do each week during the summer program

    • It is possible to reinforce literacy goals orally → you don’t have to be inside to help with goals

      • Ex: Make kids speak in complete sentences

    • This training is meant to help you emphasize literacy but not take away from what you are already doing well

 

  • Notes and Tips:

    • Have kids repeat back instructions

    • A musical element helps group pay attention without teacher having to raise their voice (ex: metal xylophone)

    • Literacy is complex and there is no one way to teach a child to read

    • You can always be building language with your students in small ways

    • When you can't lead kids to the answer, tell them the answer and have them repeat it back to you

    • When you ask one student a question and they cannot answer right away, don’t let other students answer for them. This pattern can repeat hundreds of times throughout a students career and become an engrained pattern.

      • Better to help them in reaching in answer

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